MATERIALS AND SYSTEMS TO IMPROVE OCCUPANT HEALTH AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

INITIATOR FUND 

Project period: January – March 2018 

GW4 community leads 

University of Bath: Richard Ball, Chris Bowen (joint PIs) 

University of Bristol: Valeska Ting  

Cardiff University: Robert Davies, Diane Gardner  

University of Exeter: Yanqiu Zhu, Meiling Zhu 

Project overview 

We will identify opportunities to develop and apply the next generation of technologically advanced ceramic materials and systems to improve the environmental impact and occupant health and wellbeing in the built environment. 

Background 

Buildings play an important role in our lives. Investigations into advanced materials and systems for the built environment could generate huge impacts, and provide key opportunities to promote the sustainable health and well-being of their occupants through integrated systems and technologies to provide clean air, water and sanitation.  

Furthermore, the construction industry is responsible for the use of a high volume of material compared to other sectors. The use of cement alone is responsible for 8% of anthropogenic CO2. In order to provide resilience and action on short-term environmental shocks and long-term environmental change, the buildings which make up our cities must be sustainable and have a minimal impact on the environment.  

We expect to generate huge impacts, and provide key opportunities to promote the sustainable health and well-being of building occupants through integrated systems and technologies to provide clean air, environmentally friendly energy and structural health monitoring. 

Project summary 

We have established a community between academic and industry project partners with particular knowledge and expertise in the areas of energy harvesting, photocatalytic materials and indoor air quality. These collaborations were supported and strengthened by a 2 day workshop which identified the technical challenges, expertise and resources needed to address the research goals. These plans were developed into a grant proposal and further grant outlines for the community to pursue.